Tag Archives: Migrant Labour

“We are afraid”

Via taz gazete An article reporting about the situation of Syrians in Izmir and growing racist tensions and attacks. Available in Turkish and German.


Foto: Sevda Aydın. Suriye’deki iç savaşın hemen başlarında en çok göç alan bölgelerden biri Basmane’ydi.

„Ceplerinde dolarlar var ama bedava çorba içiyorlar“

Büyük İskender, gördüğü bir rüyanın ardından insanların eskisinden dört kat mutlu yaşayacağını düşünerek Kadifekale’ye bir kent kurmaya karar verir. Kadifekale’de şimdilerde eskisinden dört kat daha mutsuz mülteciler yaşıyor.


„Wir haben Angst“

In İzmir leben 140.000 Syrer*innen. Viele Einheimische sehen sie als Gäste, die irgendwann wieder zurückkehren sollen – manche greifen die Geflüchteten an.

Continue reading “We are afraid”

Migrant Labour Exploitation at Increase, the Report Reveals

Birgün introduces the striking data on the migrant labour in Turkey as indicated by the report prepared by the Republican People’s Party (CHP) titled “Migrant Labour in our Country”.


Via Birgün – According to the “Migrant Labour in Our Country” report prepared by CHP (Republican People’s party) Labour Bureau, the majority of migrants, with Syrians at the first place, work irregularly, under heavy exploitative conditions, and dozens of them loose their lives in workplace homicides.

The report reveals that the the regulation prepared by the government on 2016 regarding the entitlement of work permit to migrant workers could not solve the problem. According to the data provided by the ministry, the numbers of work permits granted to migrants are: 17,466 in 2011; 32,729 in 2012; 45,825 in 2013; 52,295 in 2014; 64,521 in 2015;and 73,650 in 2016. Finally in 2017, the migrants who received the work permit have been 87 thousand. Continue reading Migrant Labour Exploitation at Increase, the Report Reveals

Syrians in Turkey face anger and violence

Tensions mount as displaced migrants experience attacks and difficulty finding work

Syrian refugees on Istiklal avenue in Istanbul: more than 3.7 million Syrians are registered in Turkey. Photograph: Bulent kilic/AFP/Getty Images

Via The Irish Times

Turkey is home to more displaced Syrians than any other country, but growing intercommunal violence between refugees and their hosts is straining relations.

Sanliurfa, a city of 830,000 people in southeast Turkey, is the latest to be rocked by unrest between Syrians and Turks. On September 27th, two Turkish youths were killed by Syrians following an argument between neighbouring families. In the days that followed, angry mobs of locals attacked Syrians and their businesses, confining many to their homes for much of the past week.

The discord prompted the governor and mayor of Sanliurfa to hold a crisis meeting with the city’s police chief and several NGOs to work out ways to ease tensions. Almost a quarter of the population of Sanliurfa province are Syrians and, Istanbul aside, the region is home to more Syrian refugees than any other province in the country. Continue reading Syrians in Turkey face anger and violence

Syrian Refugees as Seasonal Migrant Workers: Re-Construction of Unequal Power Relations in Turkish Agriculture

This week, the Journal of Refugee Studies published a new paper by Deniz Pelek on Syrian refugees working in the agricultural sector in Turkey.

Abstract: This article examines the case of Syrian refugees as seasonal migrant workers in Turkey and critically discusses the working and living conditions fostering their relative vulnerability compared to other workers. Syrian refugees are subject to discriminatory practices in terms of lower wages, longer working hours and improper sheltering conditions. This article explores how unequal power relations between ethnically different groups of workers in the agricultural sector are (re)constructed and the consequences of the emergence of Syrian refugees as a novel class. The essential aim of this study is to unravel the process and practice of ethnically hierarchized agricultural labour market after the entrance of refugees.

Continue reading Syrian Refugees as Seasonal Migrant Workers: Re-Construction of Unequal Power Relations in Turkish Agriculture

IOM to support Turkey to build a new labour migration management system

Via IOM Turkey

Fleeing worsening war, Afghans find narrowing options in Turkey

Via IRIN

The Turkish city of Erzurum sits on an expansive green plain, ringed on all sides by towering mountains. Best known as a destination for winter sports enthusiasts, who flock here when snow blankets the nearby slopes, it is also a gateway for another set of visitors – Afghans uprooted by their country’s long and brutal war.

Located about 240 kilometres from the Iranian border, Erzurum is one of the main transportation hubs between Turkey’s far eastern regions and the rest of the country. Before a recent crackdown, its parks, mosques, and bus station overflowed as people slept rough before continuing on to Ankara, Istanbul, or towards the border with Europe.

Once viewed as a short-term transit point, the city has increasingly become an unexpected destination for the ever-growing number of Afghans fleeing to Turkey – a destination where new arrivals find themselves trapped with narrowing options and slim job prospects. Continue reading Fleeing worsening war, Afghans find narrowing options in Turkey

Syrian Entrepreneurs in Turkey provide employment to 100 thousand

Via Sputniknews

According to the report of Building Markets, the number of Syrian companies in Turkey is above 10 thousand.

According to the report Turkish Economics and Politics Research Foundation (TEPAV) prepared, based on the data drawn from The Union of Chambers and Commodity Exchanges of Turkey (TOBB), 6,589 company was founded with Syrian capital between 2010-2017.

The number of Syrians employed in these small and medium-scale Syrian companies are estimated to be around 100,000. Syrians under “temporary protection” in Turkey are not exempt from work permit. In order to hire a Syrian, the employer should apply to work permit through the Ministry of Labour, Family and Social Services, and the companies are obliged to limit the number of Syrians with 10% of the all employees.

The banality of evil and the normalization of the discriminatory discourses against Syrians in Turkey

Via Aysecan Terzioglu in Anthropology of the Contemporary Middle East and Central Eurasia 4(2): 34-47 This article discusses the ways in which discriminatory political, social and cultural discourses and practices against the Syrian forced migrants affect the health of Syrians in Turkey. It also contends that though these discourses and  practices stem from the current political environment, they are also related to complex and problematic interactions between Turkey and Arab countries in the past, particularly the clash between Arab and Turkish nationalisms. Continue reading The banality of evil and the normalization of the discriminatory discourses against Syrians in Turkey

Turkey is selling a story about refugees, and the EU is buying it

Via Ahval News / Nurcan Baysal (from August 25)- Before the European Union and Turkey signed an agreement in 2016 to limit the number of Syrian refugees heading to Europe in return for aid to help those who had fled the war to Turkey, I was among a group of academics and activists who work on refugee issues in Turkey invited to Berlin to discuss the matter.

We sat with German and EU politicians in closed meetings to discuss the condition of refugee camps in Turkey. Issues on our agenda included Turkey’s potential to be a safe third country, as well as the management of camps run by Turkey’s Disaster and Emergency Management Authority, including their lack of transparency and oversight.

Continue reading Turkey is selling a story about refugees, and the EU is buying it

Syrian refugees find Turkey more welcoming than western Europe

Most of the 3.5m Syrians in Turkey can at least work, but the future is precarious

 

Reporting on the Turkish-EU Border Regime