Tag Archives: Syrians

‘The head is Turkish, the body Syrian’: Expanding Turkish influence in northern Syria

We feel the urge to publish this internal view of Syria:direct from the out-of-sight Turkish-Syrian border, that is further moved into the northern Syrian territory. Since the Turkish state is increasingly investing in both internal and external policies for the return of Syrian refugees, in addition to the EUropean border regime that is extra fortified via the externalization of controls even-beyond the neighboring Turkey, it is vital to keep an eye on the ongoing situation at the Northern Syria. Apparently, Northern Syria became a regional refugee accommodation center for the displaced Syrians, with Turkey’s effort to exert control over the area through various mechanisms.  Therefore the region’s condition is a central determinant both for the responses of Syrian refugees in Turkey (be it from the region or not) to the incentives of return, and for the Syrians in Syria in considering their survival chances within the region or the options of further movement.


Via Syria:direct

Inauguration of a courthouse in a-Rai in September. Photo courtesy of the National Police and General Security Forces in a-Rai.

AMMAN: When the governor of Turkey’s Kilis province arrived at the opening ceremony of a new courthouse in the northern Aleppo town of a-Rai last month, he was met by Turkish music blasting out of speakers and salutes from local Syrian police officers. Continue reading ‘The head is Turkish, the body Syrian’: Expanding Turkish influence in northern Syria

HarekAct Newsletter VI – July, August and September 2018

TURKEY’S MIGRATION MANAGEMENT REGIME

Following our attendance at the Kritnet Conference in last May, we finally had the chance to share our contributions in HarekAct. One of our editors focused on the post EU-Turkey deal context in Istanbul, Turkey, which is marked by policies and practices of marginalization, irregularization and criminalization of migrants. The unfavorable conditions in the provision of registration, services and protection, with the implementation of additional mechanisms of securitization, detention and forced deportation, has had the impact of extending the constraints of the global border regime further to directly affect the living experiences of migrants in Istanbul.

In July, Human Rights Watch also published a report on the consequences of Turkey’s suspension of registering Syrians in Istanbul and other nine cities along the Syrian border. The report claims that this practice represents Turkey’s latest efforts in denying new asylum-seekers protection, following the closure of the borders and the shooting at individuals attempting to cross. Ultimately it is forcing Syrians to live under the risk of deportation, without access to urgent services, and having to depend on smugglers inside Turkey.

Reports reveal Turkey’s further plans to engineer the movement of more Syrian populations to the outskirts of Turkey. One of the sources mentions a decision to transfer 34,180 Syrian refugees from five camps to facilities closer to the border with Syria, and another quotes Erdoğan’s pledge to create more safe zones in Syria in order to allow refugees to return. Continue reading HarekAct Newsletter VI – July, August and September 2018

Report on refugee crimes debunks far-right perception of Syrians

via Daily Sabah

A report by the Interior Ministry is debunking claims by Turkish far-right circles that Syrian refugees in Turkey, which hosts the largest refugee community in the world, are mostly criminals.

Figures by the Directorate of Migration which oversees refugee affairs shows that the crime rate among Syrians in Turkey was only 1.46 percent this year and dropped from 1.53 percent last year.

Turkey is home to more than 3.5 million displaced Syrians and has been praised by the international community for its exemplary hospitality although ultranationalists in the country argue that the refugees are a burden and they are often involved in crimes. The migration authority says Syrians were only involved in 1.98 percent of the more than 1.9 million “incidents” across Turkey, and the perpetrators were Syrians in only 1.46 percent of those incidents.

Continue reading Report on refugee crimes debunks far-right perception of Syrians

The Guardian on unlawful deportation from Turkey to Syria

Via The Guardian [16.10.2018]With tension mounting in Idlib, people trying to flee across the border are being given the choice of detention or waiving their right to asylum

The Syrian town of Atimha, at the border wall between Turkey and Syria.
The Syrian town of Atimha, at the border wall between Turkey and Syria. Photograph: Osman Orsal/Reuters

Tareq* can recall in detail each of the 22 times he climbed over the concrete border wall, dodged a flurry of bullets, and sprinted as fast as he could – until Turkish border guards caught him and turned him back.

On his 23rd attempt, the soldiers drove the 26-year-old Syrian to a police station called Branch 500 in Hatay. There they presented him with a choice: either stay in prison – for how long, they wouldn’t say – or sign a paper and walk free.

“It’s not like they’re physically putting a gun to your head, but you have no other option,” Tareq says. He signed and the next day he was driven across the border and dropped back where he had started, in Idlib.

Continue reading The Guardian on unlawful deportation from Turkey to Syria

Syrian refugees in Turkey and the changing concept of Turkish citizenship

Via Middle East Monitor – Granting citizenship to Syrians in Turkey is a topic of discussion today more than ever before. So far, more than 50,000 Syrians have acquired Turkish citizenship. This has ignited debates among the Turkish public, primarily due to the provocative media coverage of the topic and increasing nationalism in Turkey.

A Syrian family is seen on a pick up truck with their belongings as they return to their homes Afrin and Idlib, after Turkish Armed Forces and Free Syrian Army (FSA) took complete control of northwestern Syria’s Afrin from PKK/KCK/PYD-YPG and Daesh terror groups within the “Operation Olive Branch” on 24 March, 2018 [Halil Fidan/Anadolu Agency]

Citizenship is considered a pillar of any long-term integration process. In this regard, there have been two major undertakings regarding the naturalisation of Syrians in Turkey: the change of discourse about Turkish citizenship and the change in practices of granting citizenship to Syrian refugees.

Continue reading Syrian refugees in Turkey and the changing concept of Turkish citizenship

Syrian Refugees as Seasonal Migrant Workers: Re-Construction of Unequal Power Relations in Turkish Agriculture

This week, the Journal of Refugee Studies published a new paper by Deniz Pelek on Syrian refugees working in the agricultural sector in Turkey.

Abstract: This article examines the case of Syrian refugees as seasonal migrant workers in Turkey and critically discusses the working and living conditions fostering their relative vulnerability compared to other workers. Syrian refugees are subject to discriminatory practices in terms of lower wages, longer working hours and improper sheltering conditions. This article explores how unequal power relations between ethnically different groups of workers in the agricultural sector are (re)constructed and the consequences of the emergence of Syrian refugees as a novel class. The essential aim of this study is to unravel the process and practice of ethnically hierarchized agricultural labour market after the entrance of refugees.

Continue reading Syrian Refugees as Seasonal Migrant Workers: Re-Construction of Unequal Power Relations in Turkish Agriculture

An open secret: Refugee pushbacks across the Turkey-Greece border

Via IRIN

Linda, a 19-year-old Syrian and registered refugee, had just crossed from Turkey into Greece at the Evros River when men carrying guns appeared, seemingly out of nowhere. She wasn’t sure if they were police officers or soldiers, but they emerged from behind trees and wore dark uniforms that helped them blend into the night.

It was mid-May, and several hours earlier Linda had boarded a mini-bus in Istanbul with around 35 other people, including children and a pregnant woman, eager to enter European Union territory. The trip had been organised by smugglers, and the passengers ended up in a remote area close to the northwestern Turkish city of Edirne. At around three in the morning they boarded small boats that ferried them across the river. Continue reading An open secret: Refugee pushbacks across the Turkey-Greece border

Syrian Entrepreneurs in Turkey provide employment to 100 thousand

Via Sputniknews

According to the report of Building Markets, the number of Syrian companies in Turkey is above 10 thousand.

According to the report Turkish Economics and Politics Research Foundation (TEPAV) prepared, based on the data drawn from The Union of Chambers and Commodity Exchanges of Turkey (TOBB), 6,589 company was founded with Syrian capital between 2010-2017.

The number of Syrians employed in these small and medium-scale Syrian companies are estimated to be around 100,000. Syrians under “temporary protection” in Turkey are not exempt from work permit. In order to hire a Syrian, the employer should apply to work permit through the Ministry of Labour, Family and Social Services, and the companies are obliged to limit the number of Syrians with 10% of the all employees.

How Syrian artists are livening up Turkey’s art scene

Via Al-Monitor Syrian artists who have come to Turkey found it difficult to find platforms to showcase their work, but this may be changing slowly.

Continue reading How Syrian artists are livening up Turkey’s art scene

Syrian shopfronts smashed by Turkish locals as tensions rise in Bursa

Via Almasdarnews

Tensions reportedly erupted between local residents and Syrians in Bursa’s commercial district on Thursday night.

Police forces intervened to disperse the crowds gathered in the market after stores were attacked with rocks following an alleged fight between Syrian and Turkish residents.

According to local media, residents attacked Syrian-owned shops and houses in the commercial district and shouted slogans against Syrians.

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This article was originally published by Almasdarnews